Friday, 28 December 2012

The 8th Habit Moving from Effectiveness to Greatness





The 8th Habit Moving from Effectiveness to Greatness By Anjum Babukhan

Anjum Babukhan, M.Ed Education Administration and Instructional Leadership, B.A Psychology
Honors Program (USA)
Stephen Covey is an internationally respected leadership authority, family expert, teacher, organizational consultant, He has made principle-centered living and leadership his life’s work. His wisdom, based on timeless truths evident in all the major religions of the world, and is meant for the citizens of the “knowledge-worker” world today whether applied at home or in the workplace. I read his books several years ago and found myself quoting him on a variety of occasions, be it inspiring teachers in my workshops, preparing teens to face “life,” or chatting with friends over life’s quibbles. The essence of his books to have become such an essential part of who I am. The “universal truths” as core principles, have fully integrated into my life’s work in education, training and social service. The fact is that any person can apply them in their own “circle of influence” whether they are a corporate scion, social worker or home maker. The Seven Habits offer a holistic approach to help cultivate personal character which is the foundation of effectiveness. These first three habits constitute a “private victory” and develop self-mastery. One needs to start inside out, first with oneself before one can be effective with others. The next three habits help one achieve “public victory” for interpersonal effectiveness. The last two tie in your whole being that is your very core essence. Habit 1- Be proactive. Recognize that although things may influence us, we are free to exercise ability to choose one’s response. This is opposite of being reactive and subscribing to be a victim of circumstance. Habit 2- Begin with the end in mind. All things are created twice, there is first a mental creation, then a physical manifestation. Habit 3- Put First Things First. Act on priorities and never let the things that matter the least be act the mercy of those that matter the most. Habit 4- Think Win-Win. Be willing to search for a solution that is better than what either one of you (us) have proposed. Habit 5- Seek to First Understand, then be Understood. A skill for listening deeply for complete understanding. A simple ground rule should be that no one can make his or her point until they have restated the other person’s point to his or her satisfaction. Habit 6 –Synergize. Discover and experience a creativity and strength that people share when they explore differences and work together. Habit 7- Sharpen the Saw. Is the habit of self-renewal through daily sharpening of our personal cutting edge in body, mind, heart and spirit. And now finally, the 8th Habit moves one from effectiveness to greatness as it explains how we should use the whole-person paradigm and “find our voice and inspire others to find theirs.” He left us with the analogy that this concept has enormous potentiality such as that of a match stick. If wrongly used, can wreak havoc and if used rightly, can enlighten our entire surrounding if we use the whole person approach. Applying the whole person approach to a “whole job,” an individual would desire to be utilized creatively, paid fairly, treated kindly, and serve human needs in principled ways respectively. In being a proactive person, one needs optimally use the space between stimulus and response with imagination (mind), independent will (body), self-awareness (heart) and conscience (spirit). Outdated is the old paradigm of the industrial age model of control and transaction. Move over now to the age of transformation and empowerment!

      Anjum Babukhan, M.Ed Education Administration and Instructional Leadership, B.A Psychology
      Honors Program (USA)



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